Pelompat Galah Legendaris Sambangi Indonesia

JAKARTA – pole vault world record holder from Ukraine, Sergey Bubka Nazarovich a visit to Indonesia on Tuesday (06/25/2013).
“I am delighted to be visiting Indonesia. It is a beautiful country, “he met at the office of Indonesian Olympic Committee (KOI), Jakarta.
Bubka record 6.15 meters in Donetsk, Ukraine, on February 21, 1993. 20 years later, the record was not resolved.
Some pole vault athletes strive to surpass the record belongs Bubka, but until now there is no new record.
“It takes skill and technique surpassed the record high for that. Young athletes should do the analysis first and then to improvise in order to surpass my record, “he said.
Sergey Bubka is the Pole Vault gold medalist in the 1988 Seoul Olympics. He’s run for Presidential election exchanges Olympics.

Jakarta Governor, Joko Widodo officially opening the X Provincial Sports Council (Musorprov X) KONI Jakarta in 2013 at the Hotel Mercure Ancol, Jakarta, on Saturday (6/4).
On that occasion, Jokowi, greeting familiar Joko Widodo also presented awards to six athletes in the sport DKI tennis and track and field athlete ever to ASEAN Para Games in Surakarta.
“By saying bismilah, Province X Koni Sports Council of Jakarta in 2013 was officially opened this morning,” said Jokowi.
After a welcome start, Jokowi, which comes with a white shirt and black pants, immediately start hitting the gong sign Musorprov event X KONI Jakarta in 2013. He hoped that the event will run smoothly.
As is known, this Council was held to discuss the three main agenda. Ie to discuss the report of activities DKI KONI 2009-2013 tenure. The second item on the agenda to discuss and establish a draft work program KONI Jakarta term of office from 2013 to 2017. After that, the activities will be followed by the election of the Chairman of KONI Jakarta period 2013-2017.

MELBOURNE (Reuters) – The Australian Olympic Committee(AOC) has called on cyclist Stuart O’Grady to step down from its Athletes’ Commission after he admitted using performance-enhancing drugs at the 1998 Tour de France.

 O’Grady, who announced his retirement this week, told a newspaper on Wednesday that he had used the banned blood-booster erythropoietin (EPO) before the notorious 1998 Tour, where he became only the second Australian to wear the yellow jersey.

 AOC secretary-general Craig Phillips contacted O’Grady by e-mail asking for his immediate resignation from the 10-member advisory body, the AOC said on Thursday.

 “Members of our London Olympic team, who elected Stuart to theAthletes’ Commission, are entitled to be angry knowing they had supported an athlete who had cheated,” AOC president John Coates said in a statement.

“Athletes’ Commission members are chosen for their qualities of integrity and leadership and by his admission Stuart does not deserve to be a member of that group.”

 A report by a French Senate inquiry released on Wednesday found the top three finishers at the 1998 tour – Italian Marco Pantani, Germany’s Jan Ullrich and American Bobby Julich – were among 18 riders who had tested positive for EPO.

The 1998 race was overshadowed by the scandal involving the Festina team, who were kicked off the race after a medical team member was arrested at the French border and customs officers seized banned substances.

O’Grady was listed by the French Senate report among 12 riders whose tests were said to be “suspicious” but he confirmed using EPO to the Adelaide Advertiser, insisting he had acted alone in sourcing it.

O’Grady announced his retirement after helping his GreenEdge team to a team time trial victory in this year’s Tour, saying he wanted to go out on a high despite being expected to race on until 2014.

The Australian team said it supported O’Grady “as a person and an advocate for a clean sport”.

“Like the majority of the riders in his generation, he was also exposed to the issues and wrongdoings of the sport and made some wrong choices in that environment,” the team said in a statement on its website (www.greenedgecycling.com).

“We would like to underline that in all of our interactions with Stuart, he has always been extremely clear about the right path for the sport and we believe that certain mistakes in the past shouldn’t be allowed to tarnish his entire career and his integrity as a person.”

Cycling Australia also declined to condemn O’Grady, blaming the era and the European “environment”.

“The late 1990’s was clearly a dark period in cycling’s international history,” the governing body said in a statement.

“(Australian) Athletes transitioning from the strict anti-doping regimes enforced under the domestic … programs were faced with a very different environment when they landed in Europe.”

Coates, though, said the “everybody else was doing it” line was no defense for using banned substances.

 “This was a shameful period for the sport of cycling which has been well documented, that is no excuse for the decision taken by Stuart O’Grady,” he added.

Sebastian Coe

“We have to go back from two years to four years. The move down to two did a lot of damage to my sport,” Lord Coe told BBC Radio 5 live’s Sportsweek.

“It is for the clean athletes. I don’t care about the cheats we weed out. These people are trashing my sport.”

While the 1500m gold medallist from Moscow 1980 and Los Angeles 1984 does not believe trust in the sport has completely evaporated, Lord Coe is concerned people are losing faith in athletics.

“It is depressing. Trust sits at the heart of this,” said Lord Coe, who is also vice-president of the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF).

“I don’t think trust is gone entirely, but it was a bad day for the sport. The big challenge here is to go on fighting, this is not a fight we can afford to lose.

“It is about trust. If fans can’t trust the athletes and go there knowing what they are watching is questionable, then we will descend to American wrestling where most of the crowd know it is fake and, worryingly, don’t care.”

Lord Coe believes that athletes are currently taking risks by cheating as the two-year ban does not take enough time out of their career to be a deterrent.

But the London 2012 organiser and current British Olympic Association chairman knows that lifetime bans are not possible.

The BOA, before Coe was elected chairman, had a policy of banning any British athletes from competing in Olympic Games for life if they had previously failed a drugs test.

 

However, in April 2012 the governing bodylost its battle with the World Anti-Doping Agency (Wada) at the Court of Arbitration for Sport (Cas) to keep the policy.

It allowed athletes such as Dwain Chambers, who failed a drugs test in 2003, to compete at London 2012

“If I could bring lifetime bans in I would,” said Lord Coe.

“The legal inhibitor to be able to do that is profound. We are not going to be able to have life bans, they would be challenged and when we have done it we have lost.

“Four years does make people think, it is a big chunk of your career but two years with appeals is often only 18 months. Too many athletes have been prepared to take the risk.”